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How to Access Kubernetes Custom Resource Definition (CRDs) from Client-go

Author: Donald Le

Last Updated: Thu, Dec 1, 2022
Kubernetes System Admin

Introduction

Kubernetes is a popular container orchestration platform responsible for creating and managing containers that allow software applications to scale out to handle the growing workload of users. Besides built-in resources such as pods or deployments, Kubernetes provides Custom Resource Definition (CRD) support so that you can define your resources with the exact format you need. Kubernetes CRD provides you with the following benefits:

  • You can use the powerful command line utility kubectl with a number of functionalities like creating or updating resources.

  • The custom resources are managed by Kubernetes directly so they can scale out or scale in when needed.

  • Kubernetes also provides a client tool that allows you to interact with Kubernetes resources programmatically.

  • Kubernetes supports several popular programming languages for client tools, such as Python, Java, Javascript, or Go.

This article will show you how to access and manipulate Kubernetes CRDS using the client-go.

Demonstration Scenario

Let's say your software department relies on Kubernetes to build applications and tools for both production and internal purposes. When implementing a new application, you wonder whether the existing Kubernetes cluster already provided the database you need to store data for the new app. To resolve that problem, you create a custom resource to manage databases inside the Kubernetes cluster. You can search for more information about the new database resource, such as the currently supported database in Kubernetes, the total number of database instances, or the available database instances for each database.

Prerequisites

To follow along with the article, you need:

  • A newly deployed Ubuntu 20.04 Vultr cloud server.

  • A Vultr Kubernetes Engine (VKE) cluster. This guide uses version 1.24.4.

  • A Go environment installed on your local workstation, used to build the tool using Kubernetes client-go to interact with the database custom resource. This demo uses Go version 1.19.

  • The kubectl tool installed on your local workstation, used to interact with the Kubernetes cluster from the command line.

Access the VKE cluster using kubectl

After you deploy the VKE cluster, download the Kubernetes config file from the VKE overview page. You need that config file to access the Vultr Kubernetes cluster.

  1. Navigate to the VKE section of the Vultr customer portal.

  2. Click the name of your VKE cluster to open the overview page.

  3. Click Download Configuration to download the config file.

    The downloaded file will have a name like "vke-example-6b5a-4e5e-a92e-example.yaml". You should rename it to "vke.yaml" and move it to your home directory for convenience. Assuming that you downloaded the file to the ~/Downloads directory, open up your terminal and type the following commands:

    $ cd ~/Downloads
    
    $ mv ${your_config_file.yaml} ~/vke.yaml
    
  4. Export the config file as an environment variable for the kubectl command line tool to access the Kubernetes cluster. Run the commands below:

    $ cd ~
    
    
    
    // Get your current home directory path 
    
    $ echo $HOME 
    
    $ export KUBECONFIG='${path_to_your_home_directory}/vke.yaml'
    
    $ kubectl get node
    
  5. You should be able to see the nodes that the Kubernetes cluster has, similar to the below:

    NAME                   STATUS   ROLES    AGE     VERSION
    
    k8s-crd-ba11fd0aaa9b   Ready    <none>   6d20h   v1.24.4
    
    k8s-crd-e29c4afea916   Ready    <none>   6d20h   v1.24.4
    

Now that you can successfully access the Kubernetes cluster using kubectl, let's move on to the next section to see how to create the database custom resource definition using kubectl.

Create the Kubernetes custom resource definition using kubectl

Kubernetes use yaml files as instructions to allow clients to interact with the Kubernetes server. The custom resource definition file (CRD file) is in yaml format. The CRD file provides information such as apiVersion, metadata, spec, and scope of the resource. Check out Kubernetes guide for creating custom resource definitions for more details about how CRD file works.

First, add a new database custom resource definition. Run the following commands to create the custom resource definition file:

$ mkdir k8s-crd-demo

$ cd k8s-crd-demo

$ nano dbs_crd.k8s.yaml

Then, copy the following yaml definitions into dbs_crd.k8s.yaml and save the file.

apiVersion: apiextensions.k8s.io/v1

kind: CustomResourceDefinition

metadata:

name: databases.resource.example.com

spec:

group: resource.example.com

versions:

    - name: v1

    served: true

    storage: true

    schema:

        openAPIV3Schema:

        type: object

        properties:

            spec:

            type: object

            properties:

                dbName:

                  type: string

                  nullable: false

                description:

                  type: string

                  nullable: false

                total:

                  type: integer

                  default: 10

                  minimum: 1

                  maximum: 100

                available:

                  type: integer

                  default: 10

                  minimum: 1

                  maximum: 100

                dbType:

                  type: string

                  enum:

                  - sql

                  - noSQL

                  - timeSeries

                  - messageQueue

                  - caching

                  nullable: false

                tags:

                  type: string

                  nullable: true

            required: ["dbName", "total", "available", "dbType"]

        required: ["spec"]

scope: Cluster

names:

    plural: databases

    singular: database

    kind: Database

    shortNames:

    - db
  • You defined the apiVersion for the custom resource with apiextensions.k8s.io/v1, which is version 1 for API extensions of Kubernetes.

  • The name of the CRD is databases.resource.example.com.

  • The name of the resource group is resource.example.com. You need to use these names when interacting with the Kubernetes custom resources using the Kubernetes go-client tool.

  • The scope of the custom resource by default is Cluster, which means you can access the custom from anywhere inside the Kubernetes cluster.

  • You can also set the scope value to Namespace to restrict access to the custom resource inside a particular namespace.

The database custom resource has information about dbName, description, total, available, dbType, and tags. The total and available fields you restrict to be integer data types and have values in the range from 1 to 100 instances. The dbType must be string and can only be one of the values as sql, noSQL, timeSeries, messageQueue, or caching.

To create this database custom resource in the Kubernetes cluster, run the following command:

$ kubectl apply -f dbs_crd.k8s.yaml

Using the apply option with kubectl tells the Kubernetes cluster to create or update the target resource. The -f option indicates that you are using a file to apply the action. You should be able to see similar output like:

customresourcedefinition.apiextensions.k8s.io/databases.resource.example.com created

Now you successfully created the custom resource definition. Let's move on to add a new database to database custom resource definition.

Add a new database resource item into the database custom resource definition. To do it, create mysql_resource_object.yaml with your editor:

$ nano mysql_resource_object.yaml

Copy the following content into mysql_resource_object.yaml:

apiVersion: "resource.example.com/v1"

kind: Database

metadata:

  name: mysql

spec:

  dbName: mysql

  description: Used for storing relation structured data.

  total: 50

  available: 50

  dbType: sql

  tags: Web Development, Data Engineering, Embedded software
  • You set the apiVersion for the resource definition with the value resource.example.com/v1.

  • The apiVersion must be in the format of resourceGroup.version.

  • The kind of resource is Database and must match the kind of the custom resource definition you already created earlier.

  • The name of the database item is "mysql" with dbType as "sql" and available instances are 50.

Run the following command to add the mysql database item to the database resource definition.

$ kubectl apply -f mysql_resource_object.yaml

Similar to creating the resource definition, use kubectl with the apply option to add a new resource. You should be able to see similar output like:

database.resource.example.com/mysql created

You now successfully added the "mysql" resource to the database custom resource definition. To check the available databases in the Kubernetes cluster, run the following:

$ kubectl get db

You should be able to see the output like:

NAME    AGE

mysql   2m58s

Or you can get detailed information for the database custom resource definition using the following command:

$ kubectl get db -o yaml

The output should look like this:

apiVersion: v1

items:

  - apiVersion: resource.example.com/v1

kind: Database

metadata:

    annotations:

    kubectl.kubernetes.io/last-applied-configuration: |

        {"apiVersion":"resource.example.com/v1","kind":"Database","metadata":{"annotations":{},"name":"mysql"},"spec":   {"available":50,"dbName":"mysql","dbType":"sql","description":"Used for storing relation structured data.","tags":"Web  Development, Data Engineering, Embedded software","total":50}}

    creationTimestamp: "2022-11-17T17:58:30Z"

    generation: 1

    name: mysql

    resourceVersion: "1419745"

    uid: 40ed6d7e-a372-4f64-8400-20376fd8fdba

spec:

    available: 50

    dbName: mysql

    dbType: sql

    description: Used for storing relation structured data.

    tags: Web Development, Data Engineering, Embedded software

    total: 50

kind: List

metadata:

resourceVersion: ""

At this step, you successfully create the database custom resource definition and added the mysql database.

Let's move on to see how you can programmatically access the database custom resource definition using Go with the help of Kubernetes go-client tool.

Interact with Kubernetes custom resources using go-client

You must initiate a go module environment and install the needed dependencies to build an app that interacts with the Kubernetes custom resources.

I. Install needed dependencies

Open the terminal and type the following go mod command to initialize the go module environment.

$ go mod init k8s-resource.com/m

The go module will automatically create a go.mod file. Add the following dependencies into your app's go.mod file to connect with the Kubernetes cluster.

require k8s.io/client-go v0.24.4



require (

    github.com/google/go-cmp v0.5.9 // indirect

    github.com/kr/pretty v0.3.0 // indirect

    github.com/rogpeppe/go-internal v1.8.0 // indirect

    github.com/stretchr/testify v1.7.1 // indirect

    gopkg.in/check.v1 v1.0.0-20201130134442-10cb98267c6c // indirect

    sigs.k8s.io/json v0.0.0-20220713155537-f223a00ba0e2 // indirect

    sigs.k8s.io/structured-merge-diff/v4 v4.2.3 // indirect

    sigs.k8s.io/yaml v1.2.0 // indirect

    )



require (

    k8s.io/api v0.24.4 // indirect

    k8s.io/apimachinery v0.24.4

    )



require (

    github.com/davecgh/go-spew v1.1.1 // indirect

    github.com/go-logr/logr v1.2.3 // indirect

    github.com/gogo/protobuf v1.3.2 // indirect

    github.com/golang/protobuf v1.5.2 // indirect

    github.com/google/gofuzz v1.2.0 // indirect

    github.com/imdario/mergo v0.3.13 // indirect; indirectap

    github.com/json-iterator/go v1.1.12 // indirect

    github.com/modern-go/concurrent v0.0.0-20180306012644-bacd9c7ef1dd // indirect

    github.com/modern-go/reflect2 v1.0.2 // indirect

    github.com/spf13/pflag v1.0.5 // indirect

    golang.org/x/net v0.2.0 // indirect

    golang.org/x/oauth2 v0.2.0 // indirect

    golang.org/x/sys v0.2.0 // indirect

    golang.org/x/term v0.2.0 // indirect

    golang.org/x/text v0.4.0 // indirect

    golang.org/x/time v0.2.0 // indirect

    google.golang.org/appengine v1.6.7 // indirect

    google.golang.org/protobuf v1.28.1 // indirect

    gopkg.in/inf.v0 v0.9.1 // indirect

    gopkg.in/yaml.v2 v2.4.0 // indirect

    k8s.io/klog/v2 v2.80.1 // indirect

    k8s.io/utils v0.0.0-20221108210102-8e77b1f39fe2 // indirect

    )

NOTE: The version of the go-client library should match the Kubernetes cluster version to prevent incompatible issues. Check out this guide for compatibility matrix details.

Then run go mod tidy to install these dependencies:

$ go mod tidy

Now that you've installed the dependencies, let's write code to interact with the Kubernetes database custom resources.

II. Write the code to interact with the Kubernetes custom resources

Let's write the code that allows the app to:

  • Create a new custom resource

  • Remove an existing one

  • Get all the current custom resources

  • Get the custom resource by the resource name

To do it, you use several built-in methods from Kubernetes go-client:

type Interface interface {

    GetRateLimiter() flowcontrol.RateLimiter

    Verb(verb string) *Request

    Post() *Request

    Put() *Request

    Patch(pt types.PatchType) *Request

    Get() *Request

    Delete() *Request

    APIVersion() schema.GroupVersion

}

You use the Post method to create a new resource, Get to retrieve all the resources or a specific resource by its name, and Delete to remove an existing resource.

II.1. Implemented Database structs and methods to interact with Kubernetes runtime

  1. Create Database structs

    You must create structs for DatabaseSpec, Database, and DatabaseList to interact with the existing database custom resource definition. Run the following commands to create a new database.go file.

    $ mkdir api
    
    $ cd api
    
    $ nano database.go
    

    Copy the following codes into the database.go file:

    package api
    
    
    
    import metav1 "k8s.io/apimachinery/pkg/apis/meta/v1"
    
    
    
    type DatabaseSpec struct {
    
    DbName      string `json:"dbName"`
    
    Description string `json:"description,omitempty"`
    
    Total       int    `json:"total"`
    
    Available   int    `json:"available"`
    
    DbType      string `json:"dbType"`
    
    Tags        string `json:"tags,omitempty"`
    
    }
    
    
    
    // +k8s:deepcopy-gen:interfaces=k8s.io/apimachinery/pkg/runtime.Object
    
    type Database struct {
    
    metav1.TypeMeta   `json:",inline"`
    
    metav1.ObjectMeta `json:"metadata,omitempty"`
    
    
    
    Spec DatabaseSpec `json:"spec"`
    
    }
    
    
    
    // +k8s:deepcopy-gen:interfaces=k8s.io/apimachinery/pkg/runtime.Object
    
    type DatabaseList struct {
    
    metav1.TypeMeta `json:",inline"`
    
    metav1.ListMeta `json:"metadata,omitempty"`
    
    
    
    Items []Database `json:"items"`
    
    }
    

    The DatabaseSpec have fields that match with the current spec database resource definition are dbName, description, total, available,dbType, and tags. Similarly, the Database and DatabaseList structs consist of fields that match with database resource definition metadata information.

  2. Create deepcopy methods. You create a deepcopy.go file to define methods so your app can interact with the Kubernetes runtime.

    $ nano deepcopy.go
    

    Copy the following code into the deepcopy.go file.

    package api
    
    
    
    import "k8s.io/apimachinery/pkg/runtime"
    
    
    
    func (in *Database) DeepCopyInto(out *Database) {
    
    out.TypeMeta = in.TypeMeta
    
    out.ObjectMeta = in.ObjectMeta
    
    out.Spec = DatabaseSpec{
    
        DbName:      in.Spec.DbName,
    
        Description: in.Spec.Description,
    
        Total:       in.Spec.Total,
    
        Available:   in.Spec.Available,
    
        DbType:      in.Spec.DbType,
    
        Tags:        in.Spec.Tags,
    
        }
    
    }
    
    
    
    func (in *Database) DeepCopyObject() runtime.Object {
    
        out := Database{}
    
        in.DeepCopyInto(&out)
    
    
    
        return &out
    
    }
    
    
    
    func (in *DatabaseList) DeepCopyObject() runtime.Object {
    
        out := DatabaseList{}
    
        out.TypeMeta = in.TypeMeta
    
        out.ListMeta = in.ListMeta
    
    
    
        if in.Items != nil {
    
            out.Items = make([]Database, len(in.Items))
    
            for i := range in.Items {
    
                in.Items[i].DeepCopyInto(&out.Items[i])
    
        }
    
        }
    
    
    
    return &out
    
    }
    

    Here you define the DeepCopyInto method for the Database struct, the DeepCopyObject method for the Database struct, and another DeepCopyObject method for the DatabaseList struct so that Kubernetes runtime can interact with these defined structs.

  3. Adding schema types to work with Kubernetes runtime. Create the register.go file for adding schema types to work with Kubernetes runtime.

    $ nano register.go
    

    Copy the following code into register.go file:

    package api
    
    
    
    import (
    
        metav1 "k8s.io/apimachinery/pkg/apis/meta/v1"
    
        "k8s.io/apimachinery/pkg/runtime"
    
        "k8s.io/apimachinery/pkg/runtime/schema"
    
    )
    
    
    
    const GroupName = "resource.example.com"
    
    const GroupVersion = "v1"
    
    
    
    var SchemeGroupVersion = schema.GroupVersion{Group: GroupName, Version: GroupVersion}
    
    
    
    var (
    
        SchemeBuilder = runtime.NewSchemeBuilder(addKnownTypes)
    
        AddToScheme   = SchemeBuilder.AddToScheme
    
    )
    
    
    
    func addKnownTypes(scheme *runtime.Scheme) error {
    
        scheme.AddKnownTypes(SchemeGroupVersion,
    
        &Database{},
    
        &DatabaseList{},
    
        )
    
    
    
        metav1.AddToGroupVersion(scheme, SchemeGroupVersion)
    
        return nil
    
    }
    

You set the GroupName and GroupVersion that match the group name and group version of the database custom resource definition. Then inside the addKnownTypes function, you add the type for Database and DatabaseList to Kubernetes runtime.

You have just implemented the Go structs, functions, and methods to interact with Kubernetes runtime at this step. The next part of the article is about defining the Kubernetes client and methods to:

  • Create a new resource

  • Get existing resources

  • Delete an existing one.

II.2. Implementing Kubernetes client and methods for interacting with Kubernetes custom resources

  1. Define the configuration for the Kubernetes Rest client. You need to define the configuration for the Kubernetes Rest client. Run the following commands to create a new api.go file.

    $ cd ..
    
    $ mkdir clientset
    
    $ cd clientset
    
    $ nano api.go
    

    Copy the following code into api.go:

    package clientset
    
    
    
    import (
    
        "context"
    
    
    
        "k8s-resource.com/m/api"
    
        "k8s.io/apimachinery/pkg/runtime/schema"
    
        "k8s.io/client-go/kubernetes/scheme"
    
        "k8s.io/client-go/rest"
    
    )
    
    
    
    type ExampleInterface interface {
    
    Databases(ctx context.Context) DatabaseInterface
    
    }
    
    
    
    type ExampleClient struct {
    
    restClient rest.Interface
    
    }
    
    
    
    func NewForConfig(c *rest.Config) (*ExampleClient, error) {
    
    config := *c
    
    config.ContentConfig.GroupVersion = &schema.GroupVersion{Group: api.GroupName, Version: api.GroupVersion}
    
    config.APIPath = "/apis"
    
    config.NegotiatedSerializer = scheme.Codecs.WithoutConversion()
    
    config.UserAgent = rest.DefaultKubernetesUserAgent()
    
    
    
    client, err := rest.RESTClientFor(&config)
    
    if err != nil {
    
        return nil, err
    
    }
    
    
    
    return &ExampleClient{restClient: client}, nil
    
    }
    
    
    
    func (c *ExampleClient) Databases(ctx context.Context) DatabaseInterface {
    
    return &databaseClient{
    
        restClient: c.restClient,
    
        ctx:        ctx,
    
    }
    
    }
    

    Here you add the rest configuration for the Kubernetes client to connect with database custom resources.

  2. Add methods for creating, deleting, and getting custom resources. You need to create a new file named databases.go.

    $ nano databases.go
    

    Copy the following code into the databases.go file.

    package clientset
    
    
    
    import (
    
    "context"
    
    
    
    "k8s-resource.com/m/api"
    
    metav1 "k8s.io/apimachinery/pkg/apis/meta/v1"
    
    "k8s.io/client-go/kubernetes/scheme"
    
    "k8s.io/client-go/rest"
    
    )
    
    
    
    type DatabaseInterface interface {
    
    List(opts metav1.ListOptions) (*api.DatabaseList, error)
    
    Get(name string, options metav1.GetOptions) (*api.Database, error)
    
    Create(*api.Database) (*api.Database, error)
    
    Delete(name string, options metav1.DeleteOptions) (*api.Database, error)
    
    }
    
    
    
    type databaseClient struct {
    
    restClient rest.Interface
    
    ctx        context.Context
    
    }
    
    
    
    func (c *databaseClient) List(opts metav1.ListOptions) (*api.DatabaseList, error) {
    
    result := api.DatabaseList{}
    
    err := c.restClient.
    
        Get().
    
        AbsPath("/apis/resource.example.com/v1/databases").
    
        Do(c.ctx).
    
        Into(&result)
    
    
    
    return &result, err
    
    }
    
    
    
    func (c *databaseClient) Get(name string, opts metav1.GetOptions) (*api.Database, error) {
    
    result := api.Database{}
    
    err := c.restClient.
    
        Get().
    
        AbsPath("/apis/resource.example.com/v1/databases").
    
        Name(name).
    
        VersionedParams(&opts, scheme.ParameterCodec).
    
        Do(c.ctx).
    
        Into(&result)
    
    
    
    return &result, err
    
    }
    
    
    
    func (c *databaseClient) Create(database *api.Database) (*api.Database, error) {
    
    result := api.Database{}
    
    err := c.restClient.
    
        Post().
    
        AbsPath("/apis/resource.example.com/v1/databases").
    
        Body(database).
    
        Do(c.ctx).
    
        Into(&result)
    
    
    
    return &result, err
    
    }
    
    
    
    func (c *databaseClient) Delete(name string, opts metav1.DeleteOptions) (*api.Database, error) {
    
    
    
    result := api.Database{}
    
    
    
    err := c.restClient.
    
        Delete().
    
        AbsPath("/apis/resource.example.com/v1/databases").
    
        Name(name).
    
        VersionedParams(&opts, scheme.ParameterCodec).
    
        Do(c.ctx).Into(&result)
    
    return &result, err
    
    }
    

Here you define the Create method to create a new resource, the Get method to get a resource by name, the List to get all current resources, and the Delete to remove an existing resource no longer needed.

Now you've added the codes for defining the Kubernetes client and methods to interact with Kubernetes custom resources. Let's move on to create a main.go file.

II.3. Creating a main.go file to interact with the Kubernetes resources.

Suppose that in your next software project, you need to use MongoDB to store data for your app. To add the "mongodb" database into the database custom resource definition, you need to do the below steps:

  1. Copy the vke.yaml config file into the current directory.

    $ cd ..
    
    $ cp ~/vke.yaml .
    
  2. Create a main.go file.

    $ cd ..
    
    $ nano main.go
    
  3. Add the following code to the main.go file:

    package main
    
    
    
    import (
    
    "context"
    
    "flag"
    
    "fmt"
    
    "log"
    
    "os"
    
    
    
    "k8s-resource.com/m/api"
    
    client "k8s-resource.com/m/clientset"
    
    metav1 "k8s.io/apimachinery/pkg/apis/meta/v1"
    
    "k8s.io/client-go/tools/clientcmd"
    
    
    
    "k8s.io/client-go/kubernetes/scheme"
    
    "k8s.io/client-go/rest"
    
    )
    
    
    
    var kubeconfig string
    
    
    
    func init() {
    
    path, err := os.Getwd()
    
    if err != nil {
    
        log.Println(err)
    
    }
    
    flag.StringVar(&kubeconfig, "kubeconfig", path+"/vke.yaml", "path to Kubernetes config file")
    
    flag.Parse()
    
    }
    
    
    
    func main() {
    
    var config *rest.Config
    
    var err error
    
    
    
    if kubeconfig == "" {
    
        log.Printf("using in-cluster configuration")
    
        config, err = rest.InClusterConfig()
    
    } else {
    
        log.Printf("using configuration from '%s'", kubeconfig)
    
        config, err = clientcmd.BuildConfigFromFlags("", kubeconfig)
    
    }
    
    
    
    if err != nil {
    
        panic(err)
    
    }
    
    
    
    api.AddToScheme(scheme.Scheme)
    
    
    
    clientSet, err := client.NewForConfig(config)
    
    if err != nil {
    
        panic(err)
    
    }
    
    
    
    context := context.TODO()
    
    
    
    newDatabase := new(api.Database) // pa == &Student{"", 0}
    
    newDatabase.Name = "mongodb"
    
    newDatabase.Kind = "Database" // pa == &Student{"Alice", 0}
    
    newDatabase.APIVersion = "resource.example.com/v1"
    
    newDatabase.Spec.DbName = "mongodb"
    
    newDatabase.Spec.Description = "Used storing unstructured data"
    
    newDatabase.Spec.Total = 100
    
    newDatabase.Spec.Available = 50
    
    newDatabase.Spec.DbType = "noSQL"
    
    newDatabase.Spec.Tags = "Web Development, nosql data"
    
    newDatabase.Spec.Available = 70
    
    
    
    projectCreated, err := clientSet.Databases(context).Create(newDatabase)
    
    if err != nil {
    
        panic(err)
    
    }
    
    
    
    fmt.Println(projectCreated)
    
    }
    

    Here you call the Create method to add mongodb database to the database custom resource definition.

  4. Execute the action. Run the main.go file.

    $ go run main.go
    

    After running this command, you should see a similar output below:

    2022/11/18 02:14:55 using configuration from '/home/example/Projects/Personal/vultr/k8s-crd/k8s-crd-full-    demo/vke.yaml'
    
    &{{ } {mongodb    f8ba273e-fd1f-4b40-b036-cf13b8c72366 1430720 1 2022-11-18 02:14:55 +0700 +07 <nil> <nil>  map[] map[] [] []  [{main Update resource.example.com/v1 2022-11-18 02:14:55 +0700 +07 FieldsV1 {"f:spec":{".":{},"f:available":{},"f:dbName":{},"f:dbType":{},"f:description":{},"f:tags":{},"f:total":{}}} }]} {mongodb Used storing unstructured data 100 70 noSQL Web Development, nosql data}}
    

    You just added the "mongodb" database. Let's try to get detailed information about the "mongodb" database using the Get method.

  5. Get detailed information for "mongodb" database. To do this, replace the main.go code with the below code.

    package main
    
    
    
    import (
    
    "context"
    
    "flag"
    
    "fmt"
    
    "log"
    
    "os"
    
    
    
    "k8s-resource.com/m/api"
    
    client "k8s-resource.com/m/clientset"
    
    metav1 "k8s.io/apimachinery/pkg/apis/meta/v1"
    
    "k8s.io/client-go/tools/clientcmd"
    
    
    
    "k8s.io/client-go/kubernetes/scheme"
    
    "k8s.io/client-go/rest"
    
    )
    
    
    
    var kubeconfig string
    
    
    
    func init() {
    
    path, err := os.Getwd()
    
    if err != nil {
    
        log.Println(err)
    
    }
    
    flag.StringVar(&kubeconfig, "kubeconfig", path+"/vke.yaml", "path to Kubernetes config file")
    
    flag.Parse()
    
    }
    
    
    
    func main() {
    
    var config *rest.Config
    
    var err error
    
    
    
    if kubeconfig == "" {
    
        log.Printf("using in-cluster configuration")
    
        config, err = rest.InClusterConfig()
    
    } else {
    
        log.Printf("using configuration from '%s'", kubeconfig)
    
        config, err = clientcmd.BuildConfigFromFlags("", kubeconfig)
    
    }
    
    
    
    if err != nil {
    
        panic(err)
    
    }
    
    
    
    api.AddToScheme(scheme.Scheme)
    
    
    
    clientSet, err := client.NewForConfig(config)
    
    if err != nil {
    
        panic(err)
    
    }
    
    
    
    context := context.TODO()
    
    
    
    projectGet, err := clientSet.Databases(context).Get("mongodb", metav1.GetOptions{})
    
    if err != nil {
    
        panic(err)
    
    }
    
    
    
    fmt.Println(projectGet)
    
    
    
    }
    

    Then run the command:

    $ go run main.go
    

    You should see a similar output as below:

    2022/11/18 02:18:20 using configuration from '/home/example/Projects/Personal/vultr/k8s-crd/k8s-crd-full-demo/vke.yaml'
    
    &{{ } {mongodb    f8ba273e-fd1f-4b40-b036-cf13b8c72366 1430720 1 2022-11-18 02:14:55 +0700 +07 <nil> <nil> map[] map[] [] []  [{main Update resource.example.com/v1 2022-11-18 02:14:55 +0700 +07 FieldsV1 {"f:spec":{".":{},"f:available":{},"f:dbName":{},"f:dbType":{},"f:description":{},"f:tags":{},"f:total":{}}} }]} {mongodb Used storing unstructured data 100 70 noSQL Web Development, nosql data}}
    
  6. Remove "mysql" database from Kubernetes cluster. Let's say you no longer need the mysql database in the Kubernetes cluster. To remove the mysql resource from the Kubernetes cluster, replace the code in main.go with the following code:

    package main
    
    
    
    import (
    
    "context"
    
    "flag"
    
    "log"
    
    "os"
    
    
    
    "k8s-resource.com/m/api"
    
    client "k8s-resource.com/m/clientset"
    
    metav1 "k8s.io/apimachinery/pkg/apis/meta/v1"
    
    "k8s.io/client-go/tools/clientcmd"
    
    
    
    "k8s.io/client-go/kubernetes/scheme"
    
    "k8s.io/client-go/rest"
    
    )
    
    
    
    var kubeconfig string
    
    
    
    func init() {
    
    path, err := os.Getwd()
    
    if err != nil {
    
        log.Println(err)
    
    }
    
    flag.StringVar(&kubeconfig, "kubeconfig", path+"/vke.yaml", "path to Kubernetes config file")
    
    flag.Parse()
    
    }
    
    
    
    func main() {
    
    var config *rest.Config
    
    var err error
    
    
    
    if kubeconfig == "" {
    
        log.Printf("using in-cluster configuration")
    
        config, err = rest.InClusterConfig()
    
    } else {
    
        log.Printf("using configuration from '%s'", kubeconfig)
    
        config, err = clientcmd.BuildConfigFromFlags("", kubeconfig)
    
    }
    
    
    
    if err != nil {
    
        panic(err)
    
    }
    
    
    
    api.AddToScheme(scheme.Scheme)
    
    
    
    clientSet, err := client.NewForConfig(config)
    
    if err != nil {
    
        panic(err)
    
    }
    
    
    
    context := context.TODO()
    
    
    
    _, err = clientSet.Databases(context).Delete("mysql", metav1.DeleteOptions{})
    
    if err != nil {
    
        panic(err)
    
    }
    
    
    
    }
    

    Then run:

    $ go run main.go
    
  7. Check if the "mysql" database is actually removed. Now, let's try to get all the current custom resources to see whether you successfully removed the "mysql" database. Replace the existing code in the main.go file with the following content:

    package main
    
    
    
    import (
    
    "context"
    
    "flag"
    
    "fmt"
    
    "log"
    
    "os"
    
    
    
    "k8s-resource.com/m/api"
    
    client "k8s-resource.com/m/clientset"
    
    metav1 "k8s.io/apimachinery/pkg/apis/meta/v1"
    
    "k8s.io/client-go/tools/clientcmd"
    
    
    
    "k8s.io/client-go/kubernetes/scheme"
    
    "k8s.io/client-go/rest"
    
    )
    
    
    
    var kubeconfig string
    
    
    
    func init() {
    
    path, err := os.Getwd()
    
    if err != nil {
    
    log.Println(err)
    
    }
    
    flag.StringVar(&kubeconfig, "kubeconfig", path+"/vke.yaml", "path to Kubernetes config file")
    
    flag.Parse()
    
    }
    
    
    
    func main() {
    
    var config *rest.Config
    
    var err error
    
    
    
    if kubeconfig == "" {
    
    log.Printf("using in-cluster configuration")
    
    config, err = rest.InClusterConfig()
    
    } else {
    
    log.Printf("using configuration from '%s'", kubeconfig)
    
    config, err = clientcmd.BuildConfigFromFlags("", kubeconfig)
    
    }
    
    
    
    if err != nil {
    
    panic(err)
    
    }
    
    
    
    api.AddToScheme(scheme.Scheme)
    
    
    
    clientSet, err := client.NewForConfig(config)
    
    if err != nil {
    
    panic(err)
    
    }
    
    
    
    context := context.TODO()
    
    
    
    projects, err := clientSet.Databases(context).List(metav1.ListOptions{})
    
    if err != nil {
    
    panic(err)
    
    }
    
    
    
    for _, k := range projects.Items {
    
    
    
    fmt.Println(k.Name)
    
    
    
    }
    
    
    
    }
    

    Let's run the main.go file:

    $ go run main.go
    

    You should only see the mongodb database displayed in the output.

    2022/11/18 02:24:08 using configuration from '/home/example/Projects/Personal/vultr/k8s-crd/k8s-crd-full-  demo/vke.yaml'
    
    mongodb
    

And that's how you can interact with Kubernetes custom resources using Kubernetes go-client tool.

Conclusion

The article explained what Kubernetes CRD is, why you would want to use Kubernetes CRD in your current working project, and how to use the Kubernetes go-client tool to interact with Kubernetes CRD programmatically. Working with Kubernetes is fun and challenging, so prepare to face new obstacles when working with it. If you want to learn more about other use cases of using Kubernetes go-client, see:

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